Posts Tagged 'Palestine'

“US mulls over how to link Palestinian, Iranian issues”

“US mulls over how to link Palestinian, Iranian issues”
April 7-11, 2010
     David Ignatius reports that the Obama administration is considering a more aggressive approach to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian issue as a means of gaining regional support against Iran (Washington Post). In response, Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett write that the proposed approach will fail and argue that Arab allies of the US will remain uninterested in a regional confrontation while Syria and Lebanon’s Hezbollah will not compromise their relations with Iran. The Leveretts argue that while the Palestinian and Iranian issues are linked, US-Iranian rapprochement must come before Arab-Israeli peace (Race for Iran).
     Ray Takeyh agrees that the Arab states are unwilling to confront Iran but offers a different critique of the proposed policy, arguing instead that the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the Iranian nuclear issue should be decoupled. Takeyh believes US pressure on Israel over the Palestinian issue would weaken the perceived strength of the US-Israeli alliance, diminishing the credibility of Israeli military threats and leading Iran to harden its nuclear stance (Washington Post (2)).
Washington Post | Race for Iran | Washington Post (2)

Advertisements

“Domestic turmoil could weaken Tehran’s hold on Hezbollah, Hamas”

“Domestic turmoil could weaken Tehran’s hold on Hezbollah, Hamas”
July 20 & 21, 2009
     Ben Holland and Massoud A. Derhally write that domestic turmoil and economic troubles could distract Iran’s leaders from coordinating support for Palestinian group Hamas and Lebanon’s Hezbollah. Some analysts believe this could further isolate Tehran by encouraging Syria, which helps Tehran arm Hezbollah, to move closer to the US. Saudi Arabia and Egypt could gain influence over Hamas and pressure the group toward forming a unity Palestinian government with Fatah (Bloomberg). Juan Cole counters that Tehran is likely to continue supporting Hamas and Hezbollah in order to secure much-needed prestige, adding that the two groups could “thrive” without foreign support or obtain funds from Iran’s rivals in the region (Informed Comment).
     In a report featuring an interview with Sheikh Naim Qassem, Hezbollah’s second-in-command, Nicholas Blanford suggests that Hezbollah’s future could depend on the continued rein of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. Blanford details the reliance of Hezbollah, which was established in 1982 with Iranian help, on Khamenei for spiritual and political leadership as well as for an estimated “hundreds of millions of dollars” in funds annually for its social welfare and military activities. Blanford adds that Hezbollah may choose not to retaliate on behalf of Tehran in the event of a full-scale attack on Iran (Christian Science Monitor).
Bloomberg | Informed Comment | Christian Science Monitor

“Coverage of protests largely subdued among Iran’s Arab allies and enemies”

“Coverage of protests largely subdued among Iran’s Arab allies and enemies”
June 22 & 23, 2009
     In an overview of Arab media coverage of the protests in Iran, Josie Delap and Robert Lane Greene speculate that state media in Egypt and Saudi Arabia, both of which strongly oppose Iran’s nuclear program, have been “eerily quiet” on the protests due to government fears of similar domestic discontent. Controversy over the election results has also been downplayed in Syria, an ally of Iran, as well as in media owned by Lebanon’s Hezbollah. However, media outlets in Lebanon and the Gulf emirates (with the exception of Bahrain) are offering more extensive coverage and have been supportive of the Iranian opposition, and pan-Arab publications based in London have portrayed the current developments as a serious threat to the Iranian government (The New Republic).
     Other analysts add that Arab states such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia are afraid of angering Tehran and continue to hope the US and European states will address the election issue and the overall Iranian threat (Associated Press). Ronen Berman writes that debate in Palestinian online media has been minimal due to the view that regardless of the outcome of the controversy, Iran will continue to provide support for Hamas and Islamic Jihad and seek to destroy Israel. Nicholas Blanford says that while Hezbollah prefers President Ahmadinejad to Mir-Hossein Mousavi, they are more concerned about the power struggle between Iran’s clerical rulers and Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, as Khamenei has provided the group with funds, arms and military training (New York Times).
The New Republic | Associated Press | New York Times